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Restaurant Week in Palm Springs!

by Rob Zwemmer

Come experience the best in desert dining at Palm Springs Desert Resorts Restaurant Week May 30 
through June 8. This is a great opportunity to savor your favorites at many of the best 
dining destinations in the desert. Visit a favorite restaurant and try something new, or visit somewhere you've never been and find out what everyone's been talking about. Three-course meals will be available priced at $26 
or $38. 
Desert hotels and attractions are offering great rates, so tell friends and family they may want 
to come out and visit right now!

Come experience the best in desert dining at Palm Springs Desert Resorts Restaurant Week May 30 through June 8. This is a great opportunity to savor your favorites at many of the best dining destinations in the desert. Visit a favorite restaurant and try something new, or visit somewhere you've never been and find out what everyone's been talking about. Three-course meals will be available priced at $26 or $38. 

Desert hotels and attractions are offering great rates, so tell friends and family they may want to come out and visit right now!

Inspiration for Today: The Story of A Butterfly

by Rob Zwemmer

A man found a cocoon of a butterfly. One day a small opening appeared. He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours as it struggled to squeeze its body through the tiny hole.
Then it stopped, as if it couldn’t go further.
So the man decided to help the butterfly.
He took a pair of scissors and
snipped off the remaining bits of cocoon.
The butterfly emerged easily but
it had a swollen body and shriveled wings.
The man continued to watch it,
expecting that any minute the wings would enlarge
and expand enough to support the body,
Neither happened!
In fact the butterfly spent the rest of its life
crawling around.
It was never able to fly.
What the man in his kindness
and haste did not understand:
The restricting cocoon and the struggle
required by the butterfly to get through the opening
was a way of forcing the fluid from the body
into the wings so that it would be ready
for flight once that was achieved.
Sometimes struggles are exactly
what we need in our lives.
Going through life with no obstacles would cripple us.
We will not be as strong as we could have been
and we would never fly.
A man found a cocoon of a butterfly. One day a small opening appeared. He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours as it struggled to squeeze its body through the tiny hole. Then it stopped, as if it couldn’t go further.

So the man decided to help the butterfly. He took a pair of scissors and snipped off the remaining bits of cocoon. The butterfly emerged easily, but it had a swollen body and shriveled wings. The man continued to watch it, expecting that any minute the wings would enlarge and expand enough to support the body. Neither happened! In fact, the butterfly spent the rest of its life crawling around. It was never able to fly.

What the man in his kindness and haste did not understand: The restricting cocoon and the struggle required by the butterfly to get through the opening was a way of forcing the fluid from the body into the wings so that it would be ready for flight once that was achieved.

Sometimes struggles are exactly what we need in our lives. Going through life with no obstacles would cripple us. We will not be as strong as we could have been and we would never fly.

Summer Pool Safety

by Rob Zwemmer

With the Summer months approaching pool safety is an issue that becomes top of mind, particularly when there are children in the household. Good safety practices can prevent a tragedy. The Consumer Product Safety Commission states 250 children are likely to die from drowning in home pools, and another 2600 will be hospitalized. A quick lapse in parental supervision is responsible for almost 70% of drowning accidents; parents that thought they were not paying attention for just a couple of seconds. That’s how fast a disaster can occur. 

There are several things to check and implement before you take to the pool for family fun in the sun.

Pool fences are the best deterrent against drowning. Pool fences must be designed to stand at least 4-ft. so they are not climbable. Iron fences should have spacing between vertical bars no more than 4 inches apart. Horizontal supports must be mounted facing the pool and spaced greater than 45 inches apart. Fence gates must be self-closing and self-latching so they slam shut each time they are opened. Gate latches should be mounted at least 54 inches off the ground and have child-proof release mechanisms. Pool fence specifications vary by municipality so be sure to check with your town's building code officials or a professional fence contractor before installation. 

Battery powered door alarms should be installed on all exterior doors leading to the pool. If the door is opened without depressing the child proof bypass button, an alarm sounds within 7 seconds and stays on until disabled. The alarm also warns if someone leaves the door open. If it remains open for more than 10 seconds, even after pressing the bypass button, it will sound again.  

Fence alarms are designed to be used outside for fence gates. These alarms can give off an immediate alert and let you know a child has wandered off.

Pool alarms are designed to detect the splash that occurs if a child falls into a pool. A warning sound can get your attention so you can react when precious seconds matter.

Be sure your home is up to date and equipped with the safety features needed to safeguard the children.

 


With the Summer months approaching pool safety is an issue that becomes top of mind, particularly when there are children in the household. Good safety practices can prevent a tragedy. The Consumer Product Safety Commission states 250 children are likely to die from drowning in home pools, and another 2600 will be hospitalized. A quick lapse in parental supervision is responsible for almost 70% of drowning accidents; parents that thought they were not paying attention for just a couple of seconds. That’s how fast a disaster can occur. 


There are several things to check and implement before you take to the pool for family fun in the sun.


Pool fences are the best deterrent against drowning. Pool fences must be designed to stand at least 4-ft. so they are not climbable. Iron fences should have spacing between vertical bars no more than 4 inches apart. Horizontal supports must be mounted facing the pool and spaced greater than 45 inches apart. Fence gates must be self-closing and self-latching so they slam shut each time they are opened. Gate latches should be mounted at least 54 inches off the ground and have child-proof release mechanisms. Pool fence specifications vary by municipality so be sure to check with your town's building code officials or a professional fence contractor before installation. 


Battery powered door alarms should be installed on all exterior doors leading to the pool. If the door is opened without depressing the child proof bypass button, an alarm sounds within 7 seconds and stays on until disabled. The alarm also warns if someone leaves the door open. If it remains open for more than 10 seconds, even after pressing the bypass button, it will sound again.  


Fence alarms are designed to be used outside for fence gates. These alarms can give off an immediate alert and let you know a child has wandered off.


Pool alarms are designed to detect the splash that occurs if a child falls into a pool. A warning sound can get your attention so you can react when precious seconds matter.


Be sure your home is up to date and equipped with the safety features needed to safeguard the children.

Olive Crest: Jill, A Life Transformed

by Olive Crest

Palm Springs Air Museum Memorial Day Event

by Rob Zwemmer

 

Monday 5/26 - 11am-3:30pm  Palm Springs Air Museum Memorial Day Flower Drop & Air Fair
Day long activities and flight exhibitions book end the 1 PM Flower Drop Program & Flight during which a vintage warbird drops 3,000 red and white carnations on the tarmac commemorating...
Cost: Included with museum admission, ranging from $8 - $15.
Where:
Palm Springs Air Museum
745 N. Gene Autry Trail
Palm Springs, CA  92262
View map »
Sponsor: Palm Springs Air Museum
Telephone: 760-778-6262
Contact Name: Ann Greer

 

Honor and salute our fallen heroes at the Palm Springs Air Museum Memorial Day Flower Drop & Air Fair on Monday, Memorial Day, 11am-3:30pm

Day long activities and flight exhibitions including the 1 PM Flower Drop Program & Flight. Be on hand to witness the vintage warbird that drops 3,000 red and white carnations on the tarmac as we remember our service men and women who had fought so gallantly and served our country.


Cost: Included with Museum Admission, $8 - $15.

Palm Springs Air Museum
745 N. Gene Autry Trail
Palm Springs


Sponsor: Palm Springs Air Museum
760-778-6262
Contact: Ann Greer

Energy-Conserving Tips

by Rob Zwemmer

Seal air leaks and properly insulate. Plug energy leaks with weather stripping and caulking, and 
be sure your house is properly insulated to save up to 20% on heating and cooling bills, while 
also increasing home comfort.
Install a programmable thermostat to save up to 10% on cooling and heating costs.
Change to new and improved light bulbs. Reduce energy use from about a third to as much as 80% 
with today’s increasing number of energy-efficient halogen incandescents, CFLs and LEDs.
Look for the Energy Star label, the government’s symbol of energy efficiency, on a wide range of 
consumer products to save up to 30% on related electricity bills.
Wash clothes in cold water.  Heating the water in a washer uses 90% of the energy used to wash 
clothes. According to Energy Star, by switching to cold water the average household can save 
between $30-$40 annually.
Turn off all lights, appliances and electronics not in use. Use a power strip and turn off 
devices and lights that are not in use to cut standby power, by doing this the average household 
will save $100 a year on their energy bill!
Be an energy efficient renter. Even if you don’t own your home, you can keep your electric bill 
down by making energy efficient choices in the areas of your home that you have control over.
Clean or change filters regularly. A dirty furnace or A/C filter will slow down air flow and 
make the system work harder to keep you warm or cool.
Reduce water heater temperature to 120° F to save energy and money on heating water; and wrap 
the water storage tank in a specially-designed “blanket” to retain the heat. If your water 
heater is in need of replacement, consider installing an energy efficient tankless water heater.
Use low-flow faucets and shower heads to save on water bills.

Are your utility bills too high? Do you want to do your part and conserve more energy? Here are a few tips that will accomplish these goals for you:

Seal air leaks and properly insulate. Plug energy leaks with weather stripping and caulking, and be sure your house is properly insulated. You can save up to 20% on heating and cooling bill while increasing comfort.

Install a programmable thermostat to save up to 10% on cooling and heating costs.

Change to the new and improved light bulbs. Reduce energy use from about a third to as much as 80% with today’s increasing number of energy-efficient halogen incandescents, CFLs and LEDs.

Look for the Energy Star label, the government’s symbol of energy efficiency, on a wide range of consumer products to save up to 30% on related electricity bills.

Wash clothes in cold water. Heating the water in a washer uses 90% of the energy used to wash clothes. According to Energy Star, by switching to cold water the average household can save between $30-$40 annually.

Turn off all lights, appliances and electronics when not in use. Use a power strip and turn off devices and lights that are not in use to cut standby power, by doing this the average household will save $100 a year on their energy bill!

Clean or change filters regularly. A dirty furnace or A/C filter will slow down air flow and make the system work harder to keep you comfortable.

Reduce water heater temperature to 120° F to save energy and money on heating water. Wrap water storage tank in a specially-designed blanket to retain the heat. If your water heater is in need of replacement, consider installing an energy-efficient tankless water heater.

Use low-flow faucets and shower heads.

 


Inspiration for Today: Don't Forget to Pack Your Insight!

by Rob Zwemmer

How wonderful it is to learn new things and see new places! How would we ever grow as individuals if we never experienced anything different from that which we see and do in our daily lives? Two different voyages come to mind, however, when considering the discovery of that which is "new" - an outward journey, and one which turns inward.
Your outward "voyage of discovery" takes you to different places and new people. You begin to understand other things outside yourself. This can be as simple as discovering new-found beauty on a wilderness "adventure," or having an engaging conversation or correspondence with someone from a completely different part of the country or the world. The ultimate goal here is not just looking at new things, but looking at things in a new way! A change of scenery can effect a change of mind.
But you can still experience a voyage of discovery even if you don't travel anywhere, even if you don't meet anyone new. You don't have to change your surroundings, just the way you look at them - with "new eyes!" Sometimes stepping back and looking again at the Big Picture can reveal things that you never saw before. The solution to an ongoing problem can suddenly manifest itself.
This can often be the key to unlocking the door to your happiness - finding a way to change yourself instead of changing what surrounds you. For all those situations that seem to be out of your control, you have to realize that you are always in control of yourself. So much stress comes from frustration. Don't keep running up against that rock that represents your problems. Try to act like the water that simply flows around the rock as it continues its journey downstream. Your inward voyage of change can have dramatic results on how you see what's around you! Enjoy your new outlook!

How wonderful it is to learn new things and see new places! How would we ever grow as individuals if we never experienced anything different from that which we see and do in our daily lives? Two different voyages come to mind, however, when considering the discovery of that which is "new" - an outward journey, and one which turns inward.


Your outward "voyage of discovery" takes you to different places and new people. You begin to understand other things outside yourself. This can be as simple as discovering new-found beauty on a wilderness "adventure," or having an engaging conversation or correspondence with someone from a completely different part of the country or the world. The ultimate goal here is not just looking at new things, but looking at things in a new way! A change of scenery can effect a change of mind.


But you can still experience a voyage of discovery even if you don't travel anywhere, even if you don't meet anyone new. You don't have to change your surroundings, just the way you look at them - with "new eyes!" Sometimes stepping back and looking again at the Big Picture can reveal things that you never saw before. The solution to an ongoing problem can suddenly manifest itself.


This can often be the key to unlocking the door to your happiness - finding a way to change yourself instead of changing what surrounds you. For all those situations that seem to be out of your control, you have to realize that you are always in control of yourself. So much stress comes from frustration. Don't keep running up against that rock that represents your problems. Try to act like the water that simply flows around the rock as it continues its journey downstream. Your inward voyage of change can have dramatic results on how you see what's around you! Enjoy your new outlook!

Olive Crest: Kathy, A Life Transformed

by Olive Crest

Memorial Day Weekend Recipe

by Rob Zwemmer

 

Grandma's Potato Salad
6 pounds medium red potatoes
  Water
  DRESSING:
  1 cup water
  1/2 cup butter, cubed
  1/4 cup white vinegar
  2 eggs
  1/2 cup sugar
  4-1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
  3/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  3/4 cup Miracle Whip
  SALAD:
  1 small onion, finely chopped
  2 green onions, sliced
  1 teaspoon salt
  1/2 teaspoon pepper
  3 hard-cooked eggs, sliced
  Paprika
Place potatoes in a stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain. When cool enough to handle, peel and slice potatoes; cool completely.
For dressing, in the top of a double boiler or metal bowl over barely simmering water, heat water, butter and vinegar until butter is melted. In a small bowl, beat eggs; add sugar and cornstarch. Add to butter mixture; cook and stir for 5-7 minutes or until thickened. Transfer to a large bowl; cool completely.
In a small bowl, beat cream until stiff peaks form. Stir Miracle Whip into cooled dressing mixture; fold in whipped cream. Stir in onion, green onions, salt and pepper. Add potatoes; toss lightly to combine. Refrigerate, covered, until chilled.
To serve, top with hard-cooked eggs; sprinkle with paprika. Yield: 24 servings (3/4 cup each).

 

A great idea for your Memorial Day table:

Grandma's Potato Salad

6 pounds medium red potatoes 

 Water 

DRESSING:  1 cup water  1/2 cup butter, cubed  1/4 cup white vinegar,  2 eggs,  1/2 cup sugar,  4-1/2 teaspoons corn starch,  3/4 cup heavy whipping cream,  3/4 cup Miracle Whip 

SALAD:  1 small onion, finely chopped  2 green onions, sliced  1 teaspoon salt,  1/2 teaspoon pepper,  3 hard-cooked eggs, sliced  Paprika


Place potatoes in a stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain. When cool enough to handle, peel and slice potatoes; cool completely.For dressing, in the top of a double boiler or metal bowl over barely simmering water, heat water, butter and vinegar until butter is melted. In a small bowl, beat eggs; add sugar and cornstarch. Add to butter mixture; cook and stir for 5-7 minutes or until thickened. Transfer to a large bowl; cool completely.In a small bowl, beat cream until stiff peaks form. Stir Miracle Whip into cooled dressing mixture; fold in whipped cream. Stir in onion, green onions, salt and pepper. Add potatoes; toss lightly to combine. Refrigerate, covered, until chilled. To serve, top with hard-cooked eggs; sprinkle with paprika.

Yield: 24 servings (3/4 cup each).

Holding Title as Joint Tenancy

by Rob Zwemmer

 

Holding Title as a Joint Tenant
Joint tenancy of a property can be held by two or more people, with each owning their own equal 
share. However, Joint Tenancy with the Right of Survivorship also includes special transfers 
that allow for title to pass to the remaining joint tenants after the death of a joint tenant. 
An affidavit of death and the death certificate of the joint tenant is typically recorded in the 
public records. These two items are enough to allow the surviving joint tenants to sell the 
home.
There are four unities that need to exist for a joint tenancy to be created. The unities 
comprise what's referenced in legal circles as TTIP:
Time: Each person must receive obtain title to the property at the same time.
Title: The deed needs to reflect the name of each person on the same document.
Interest: Each person owns an equal portion of ownership.
Possession: Each person possesses the same right to occupy the property.
If any of those four requirements do not exist, it is possible that the joint tenancy you may 
have believed was created could be challenged or contested, and possibly not result in a final 
determination of joint tenancy.
A possible consequence of Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship is if a joint tenant dies, 
that joint tenant cannot bequeath the property to an heir, other surviving relatives or to 
anybody else. 
Tenants in Common is another way to hold title, where only one unity is shared, and that unity 
is the right of possession. Tenants in common individuals can hold equal or unequal shares and 
interests can be acquired at different times.
One of the main differences between Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship and Tenants in 
Common is how title is transferred after death, and the rights of heirs. 
Under Community Property, generally the title will be subject to probate or pass to an heir upon 
the death of one or more parties, depending on your state laws. However, Community Property can 
also include the Right of Survivorship, in which case, title will not transfer to heirs. 
You may want to consult with a Real Estate lawyer upon purchase if there are any considerations 
to review and to make an informed choice on how you plan to hold title if Joint Tenancy doesn't 
suit your situation. 

 

Joint tenancy of a property can be held by two or more people, with each owning their own equal share. However, Joint Tenancy with the Right of Survivorship also includes special transfers that allow for title to pass to the remaining joint tenants after the death of a joint tenant. An affidavit of death and the death certificate of the joint tenant is typically recorded in the public records. These two items are enough to allow the surviving joint tenants to sell the home.

There are four unities that need to exist for a joint tenancy to be created. The unities comprise what's referenced in legal circles as TTIP:

Time: Each person must obtain title to the property at same time.

Title: The deed needs to reflect the name of each person on the same document.

Interest: Each person owns an equal portion of ownership.

Possession: Each person possesses the same right to occupy the property.

If any of those four requirements do not exist, it is possible that the joint tenancy you may have believed was created could be challenged or contested, and possibly not result in a final determination of joint tenancy. A possible consequence of Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship is if a joint tenant dies, that joint tenant cannot bequeath the property to an heir, other surviving relatives or to anybody else. 

Tenants in Common is another way to hold title, where only one unity is shared, and that unity is the right of possession. Tenants in common individuals can hold equal or unequal shares and interests can be acquired at different times. One of the main differences between Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship and Tenants in Common is how title is transferred after death, and the rights of heirs. 

Under Community Property, generally the title will be subject to probate or pass to an heir upon the death of one or more parties, depending on your state laws. However, Community Property can also include the Right of Survivorship, in which case, title will not transfer to heirs. 

You may want to consult with a Real Estate lawyer upon purchase if there are any considerations to review, and to make an informed choice on how you plan to hold title if Joint Tenancy doesn't suit your situation. 

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