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INSPIRATION FOR TODAY: PLAY BALL!

by Rob Zwemmer
"I hit anything that's close to the plate. I don't wait for that one pitch.”
- Rod Carew


PLAY BALL!

With the start of the major league baseball season, a simple success formula recently heard comes to mind. It uses baseball words, but contains plenty of success wisdom.

Which do you think is more important, a home run or a single base hit? Most of us would choose a home run - even a "grand slam" home run. Most of us were also brought up to believe that someday our "ship would come in" - that all of our success or wealth or whatever would arrive at once, in one grand port call.

Funny thing is - more ball games are won with base hits than with home runs. Most ships arrive slowly in port - guided by tiny tugboats - and only after having navigated the wide oceans through a series of thousands of minor navigational corrections.

Yes! Big wins and successful journeys occur most often as the result of daily decisions - not life-altering, once-a-year, mega-decisions. Want to lose weight? It won't happen because you vow on January 1 to do it. It will be the result of your daily decision to walk, run, or work out. Want excellent health? Your daily, even moment-by-moment, decisions to ingest only healthy foods and avoid junk are the ones that will win the day.

The same holds true for your success in business. While a master plan at the beginning of the year is important, it's really the steps taken each day that produce the results. As you face each of the very small daily decisions, be careful to make only the right choices. By day's end they'll add up to valuable progress both on and off the field.

Palm Springs California Real Estate, Podcast

by Rob Zwemmer

Palm Springs California Real Estate, Podcast

THE SKY IS FALLING . . . NOT!

by Rob Zwemmer

INSPIRATION FOR TODAY:

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true."
- James B. Cabell


THE SKY IS FALLING . . . NOT!

"The glass is half-full." "The glass is half-empty." "Looks like a beautiful day!" "I think it's going to rain." "I'm happy." "I'm depressed." "I'm an optimist!" "How can you be an optimist with things the way they are?"

OK, we all know the difference between an optimist and a pessimist - right? In some of Steven Covey's material, he states that "no one knows enough to be a pessimist." Pessimism, more often than not, is generated by inner fears, most likely fears "of the unknown." Hence, "No one knows enough to be a pessimist."

Consider the child about to learn the art of riding a bike. "I know I'm going to fall," proclaims the child - just before taking a skinned knee. After a week of practice, is the child still fearful? Once bike riding becomes second nature, i.e. once the child "knows" enough about bike riding, the fear (a.k.a. pessimism) disappears.

Just as the child's pessimism ("I'm going to fall...") precedes the skinned knee, our other pessimistic thoughts may precede our worst fears. By substituting a positive thought for a negative one, therefore, is it not possible that the action that follows might also be positive?

Add to that positive thought an extra measure of learning and knowledge, and it's highly unlikely there will continue to be room for either the pessimism or the subsequent negative action. From one optimist to another, heed this advice: "Don't worry - be happy!"

THE SKY IS FALLING . . . NOT!

by Rob Zwemmer

INSPIRATION FOR TODAY:

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true."
- James B. Cabell


THE SKY IS FALLING . . . NOT!

"The glass is half-full." "The glass is half-empty." "Looks like a beautiful day!" "I think it's going to rain." "I'm happy." "I'm depressed." "I'm an optimist!" "How can you be an optimist with things the way they are?"

OK, we all know the difference between an optimist and a pessimist - right? In some of Steven Covey's material, he states that "no one knows enough to be a pessimist." Pessimism, more often than not, is generated by inner fears, most likely fears "of the unknown." Hence, "No one knows enough to be a pessimist."

Consider the child about to learn the art of riding a bike. "I know I'm going to fall," proclaims the child - just before taking a skinned knee. After a week of practice, is the child still fearful? Once bike riding becomes second nature, i.e. once the child "knows" enough about bike riding, the fear (a.k.a. pessimism) disappears.

Just as the child's pessimism ("I'm going to fall...") precedes the skinned knee, our other pessimistic thoughts may precede our worst fears. By substituting a positive thought for a negative one, therefore, is it not possible that the action that follows might also be positive?

Add to that positive thought an extra measure of learning and knowledge, and it's highly unlikely there will continue to be room for either the pessimism or the subsequent negative action. From one optimist to another, heed this advice: "Don't worry - be happy!"

How Can I Fix My Credit?

by Washington post

How Can I Fix My Credit?
How you can fix recession-damaged credit
One way to reach out to clients who may have found themselves in credit trouble during the recession is to provide some friendly advice regarding sound credit practices. The following article may be something you find helpful to share with those who are interested in reclaiming their good credit:
--

The recession may have damaged your credit, even if you thought you were doing everything right. According to Kimberley Lankford, author of "Rescue Your Financial Life" (McGraw-Hill) and "The Insurance Maze" (Kaplan), in a March 6, 2010 piece for WashingtonPost.com, "credit card companies have been lowering credit limits and closing accounts in an attempt to minimize their risk -- 13 percent of people surveyed in January 2010 by Credit.com said their card company had lowered their credit limit over the past few months, and 11 percent said a card company closed their account."

But regardless of what might have happened to you, you can improve your credit rating by doing a few simple things:

- Check your credit reports from all three credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. You can get free credit reports from all three bureaus every 12 months at http://www.annualcreditreport.com, and it's worth getting all three reports because each can vary.

- Avoid "free" credit reports and scores that ask you to sign up for a pricey credit-monitoring program.

- Start paying down credit card balances. "It's the fastest way to improve your score," said FICO spokesman Craig Watts. The lower your balances, the better for your score.

- Pay your bills on time. This is the most important factor in your credit score. Late payments remain on your credit report for up to seven years, but have a smaller impact on your score as time passes

- Don't close accounts before applying for a loan. Closing credit card accounts can never help your score, Watts said.

- Avoid opening new cards in the months before taking out a mortgage.

- Pay off old fines. Parking tickets, library fines, late bills, can all hurt a score by as much as 100 points if the account ends up going to collection.

Displaying blog entries 1-5 of 5

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