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Olive Crest: Catherine's Life Began Anew

by Olive Crest

For the first 15 years of her life, Catherine bounced between foster families and relatives’ homes.  When she came to Olive Crest, she began to thrive.  Her scholastic performance improved and having never had the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities, she decided to try out for the school’s tennis and fencing teams. She earned spots on both. Catherine also attended her first formal dance. With the guidance of her Olive Crest foster parents, she is enjoying being a teenager. Catherine states that her best friend is her foster sister. This is a home where a strong, loving family has made all the difference in a child’s life.  

Find out how you can help "Be the Miracle" for a deserving child or family in your community: www.OliveCrest.org

Mountain View Showcase of Homes

by Rob Zwemmer

Olive Crest: Anguished Childhood Motivates Life's Work

by Olive Crest

 

Anguished childhood motivates life's work.

Jennifer's parents were alcoholics and drug addicts. There were many times when there was nothing to eat or drink in the house except beer, and it was not uncommon for young Jennifer to wake up to find her parents passed out from subsstance abuse. Jennifer's earliest memories include her mother trying to stab her father. When her parents eventually divorced, Jennifer's mother told her that she should have aborted her, blaming her for the divorce. Her mother started hitting her, and at 15 Jennifer was kicked out of the house.

When she came to Olive Crest, Jennifer was an angry, wounded child. But the staff never gave up and worked diligently to help her become the dignified woman she is today. Now married to a pastor, she and her husband focus on helping hurting children as part of  their ministry. Jennifer credits Olive Crest for putting a hurting teenager on the right path and changing her life forever.

Inspirational Story - Follow Your Bliss

by Rob Zwemmer

 

"He was a self-made man who owed his lack of success to nobody." 
 
~ Joseph Heller 
 
THANKS FOR NOTHING! 
 
Who ever heard of an unsuccessful "self-made" man? Does anybody set out to become a failure? Well, of course not, but a lot of people who end up that way often end up finding fault with their circumstances or the people that surround them. 
 
What is so honorable about Joseph Heller's man is that he doesn't blame anyone for his admitted lack of success. And just because he hasn't reached the summit, it doesn't stop him from feeling like a self-made man or taking full responsibility. He's still confident in himself and accepting of his situation. 
 
We should be careful, however, not to confuse acceptance with apathy. Accepting the way things are does not make us weak, because acceptance acknowledges the difference between the things we can change and those over which we have no control. Blame and apathy are the benchmarks of someone who has relinquished their control. 
 
Part of the secret of taking the sour with the sweet is applying your own perspective and coming to grips with your control or lack of control over the circumstances and the results. If you screwed up, well, so be it, as long as you personally accept your responsibility before someone else tries to make you feel incompetent. And if it wasn't your fault, why in the world would you let someone try to convince you otherwise? 
 
Eleanor Roosevelt has been attributed with wisely observing, "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." This explains the implied confidence of the gentleman in today's quote. He's not "successful," yet by blaming no one but himself, he avoids the contempt and derision of his peers. In other words, as long as you are comfortable with yourself and your decisions, no one can touch you. Follow your bliss! 

 

"He was a self-made man who owed his lack of success to nobody."  ~ Joseph Heller  

 

THANKS FOR NOTHING!  Who ever heard of an unsuccessful "self-made" man? Does anybody set out to become a failure? Well, of course not, but a lot of people who end up that way often end up finding fault with their circumstances or the people that surround them.  What is so honorable about Joseph Heller's man is that he doesn't blame anyone for his admitted lack of success. And just because he hasn't reached the summit, it doesn't stop him from feeling like a self-made man or taking full responsibility. He's still confident in himself and accepting of his situation.  We should be careful, however, not to confuse acceptance with apathy. Accepting the way things are does not make us weak, because acceptance acknowledges the difference between the things we can change and those over which we have no control. Blame and apathy are the benchmarks of someone who has relinquished their control.  

Part of the secret of taking the sour with the sweet is applying your own perspective and coming to grips with your control or lack of control over the circumstances and the results. If you screwed up, well, so be it, as long as you personally accept your responsibility before someone else tries to make you feel incompetent. And if it wasn't your fault, why in the world would you let someone try to convince you otherwise?  Eleanor Roosevelt has been attributed with wisely observing, "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." This explains the implied confidence of the gentleman in today's quote. He's not "successful," yet by blaming no one but himself, he avoids the contempt and derision of his peers. In other words, as long as you are comfortable with yourself and your decisions, no one can touch you.

Follow your bliss! 

Press Release: Olive Crest Holiday Fundraising Event

by Rob Zwemmer

 

Real Estate Team to Host ‘Olive Crest’
Holiday Fundraising Event

La Quinta, CA—November 22, 2013—Zwemmer & Associates, a local Real Estate team with Keller Williams Luxury Homes, is planning a holiday fundraiser to benefit the children of Olive Crest. The event will take place on Thursday, December 5 from 5:30pm to 8:30pm at a private residence at Mountain View Country Club in La Quinta. Several representatives from Olive Crest will be attendance to join Zwemmer & Associates and various members of the community as they help make dreams come true for youngsters this holiday season.

A “giving tree” adorned with “wish slips” will be the centerpiece of the event. Wish slips bear the name of an Olive Crest child and their own special gift wish. Attendees can select a wish slip and grant the gift wish requested by the child.

“Gift wishes can be for children, teens or entire families in need of items to make their holidays happy and complete,” said Rob Zwemmer, a board member and instrumental partner in the outreach and support of Olive Crest. “This is such an important cause everyone should get involved in. The care and safety of our children is a growing concern with many families in our community challenged by major economic issues, illness and matters of domestic abuse. It's important to reach out to the children at the center of these challenges by providing a few special gifts; possibly the only ones they will have to unwrap under the tree.

To find out more about Olive Crest and their programs, and how to contribute to “Be the Miracle”, please visit www.olivecrest.org/miracle.

 

About Olive Crest
Since 1973, Olive Crest has transformed the lives of over 60,000 abused, neglected, and at-risk children and their families. Their outreach programs meet the individual needs of kids in crisis by providing safe homes, counseling, and education for both youth and parents. Their many innovative programs reflect the conviction that strengthening the family group is one of the most powerful ways to help heal children. Olive Crest serves nearly 2,000 children and families each day throughout California, Nevada, and the Pacific Northwest. For information, call 1-800-550-CHILD (2445) or visit www.olivecrest.org.

 

 

 

 

                                                                         

Coachella Valley Market Update - Median Price Per Sq Ft

by Rob Zwemmer

While the
Valley median price declined slightly, the median for six of the nine cities in the Valley actually rose last month.

While the Valley median price declined slightly, the median for six of the nine cities in the Valley actually rose last month. In this chart, a gray line represents a 3.5% growth curve. While historically the region has experienced long-term growth of 4.5%, with negative real wage growth and very, very low inflation, the thought is this lower rate is a better guide for this market. If prices rose to meet this line it would require a gain of 22% from current price levels. This is thought to be a realistic expectation. Sales numbers in October are just slightly below last year while inventory is just slightly higher. The differences are minor and it is thought to be too uncertain to try to derive any conclusion for next year based on activity during the slow season. Distressed sales remained unchanged last month at 15% of sales, and it is still forecasted there will be an effective “end" to distressed sales by early next year.

 

- Courtesy of Market Watch, Monthly Desert Housing Report

Olive Crest : A Safe Home for the Holidays

by Rob Zwemmer

Rise to the Occasion!

by Rob Zwemmer

 

"Set your purse to fattening." 
- George S. Clason ("The Richest Man in Babylon")
 
RISE TO THE OCCASION!
 
In 1926, George Clason introduced a series of pamphlets on thrift and financial success which were widely distributed by banks and insurance companies. He used fables, set in ancient Babylon, to make his points. The most famous of them, "The Richest Man in Babylon," is familiar to millions.
 
In the story was a very rich man named Arkad. Arkad was generous with all and spent liberally, yet he grew wealthier with each passing year. A group of friends from his youth approached him, asking how he had amassed such wealth while they lived a lifestyle of mere subsistence. His answer was, "If you have not acquired more than a bare existence in the years since we were youths, it is because you have either failed to learn the laws that govern the building of wealth, or else you do not observe them." The pamphlet then goes on to explain the "Seven Cures For a Lean Purse."
 
So, who are you most like - Arkad . . . or his friends? If you know and practice Arkad's teachings, your primary obligation now is to teach your children, and their children. If you have not been so fortunate as to learn the "laws" and practice them, take heart. It is not too late.
 
In simple terms, "spend less than you earn" is the critical element that produces wealth. It also requires self-discipline, learned behavior, persistence, wisdom, knowledge, integrity, and more. But, hey, why rewrite the book here when you can just order the paperback online? It's an easy read packed with simple to follow steps to financial independence. If you're tired of the stress, worry, and frustration of never having enough, try giving this book a read!

 

"Set your purse to fattening." - George S. Clason

("The Richest Man in Babylon") 

RISE TO THE OCCASION! In 1926, George Clason introduced a series of pamphlets on thrift and financial success which were widely distributed by banks and insurance companies. He used fables, set in ancient Babylon, to make his points. The most famous of them, "The Richest Man in Babylon," is familiar to millions. In the story was a very rich man named Arkad. Arkad was generous with all and spent liberally, yet he grew wealthier with each passing year. A group of friends from his youth approached him, asking how he had amassed such wealth while they lived a lifestyle of mere subsistence. His answer was, "If you have not acquired more than a bare existence in the years since we were youths, it is because you have either failed to learn the laws that govern the building of wealth, or else you do not observe them." The pamphlet then goes on to explain the "Seven Cures For a Lean Purse." So, who are you most like - Arkad . . . or his friends? If you know and practice Arkad's teachings, your primary obligation now is to teach your children, and their children. If you have not been so fortunate as to learn the "laws" and practice them, take heart. It is not too late. In simple terms, "spend less than you earn" is the critical element that produces wealth. It also requires self-discipline, learned behavior, persistence, wisdom, knowledge, integrity, and more. But, hey, why rewrite the book here when you can just order the paperback online? It's an easy read packed with simple to follow steps to financial independence. If you're tired of the stress, worry, and frustration of never having enough, try giving this book a read!

Client Testimonial: Janet

by Rob Zwemmer

Thank you, Janet for your kind critique of the service you received from agent Kirsten Donton and Zwemmer and Associates.

Contact us when you are ready to sell or buy. We are all here for you!


Olive Crest: Catherine, Getting to Enjoy Growing Up

by Olive Crest

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 14

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